Turning candle leftovers into wax melts

You know those annoying bits that always get left behind when you burn candles? Well, you can turn them into wax melts and save wasting those last bits of candle-goodness.

I usually buy soy or rapeseed wax candles, which are easier to do this with, but it can be done with paraffin or beeswax candles too.

Step one: Release the wax! Use a knife to loosen the wax in the bottom of the jar, then put the wax into a foil cake case.

Step two: Clean the candle container. I would suggest using a paper towel or rag you don’t want to use again for this part. Use the paper towel/ rag to wipe out as much leftover wax bits as possible, and then dispose of it. Next add some washing up liquid into the container, boil enough hot water in the kettle, and pour the water into the container. Leave it to sit for a while, then rinse out. This method is most effective with soy and rapeseed wax, and you may need to use a bit more elbow grease for paraffin and beeswax to get the glass fully cleaned. Re-use or recycle the container, depending on your preferences.

Step three: Melt the wax. Place the foil case with the wax leftovers in the glass dish of an oil burner. Light the candle and wait for the wax to melt. You also get to enjoy the scent while this is in progress!

Step four: Leave to cool, and admire your new wax melt!

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It’s now ready to use whenever you want, and you’ve made use of something that might go to waste otherwise. When you’ve finished the melt you can use the foil cake case again, or wash and recycle it.

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(c) Michelle G, Northern Tamarisk, 2018

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Devotional Tip: reminders

If you have a chronic illness that affects the memory, or even if you’re a busy person who gets caught up in other things easily, a little reminder can be a valuable tool for devotions. It’s not that devotions and our Deities aren’t important to us, but sometimes the mind (or memory) just doesn’t cooperate.

As a way to help myself I have made a little sign to leave out for Saturdays or Sundays – my usual offerings days – and other times I know I want to do special prayers and offerings, or to give thanks.

(c) Michelle G, Northern Tamarisk, 2018

Spring has sprung!

After the grey days and the mizzle it’s lovely to see Spring in all its sunshine glory. Green, white and yellow prevail, lifting the sparse gloom of Winter. It’s lovely to see the trees and bushes coming back to life, and seeing more flowers start to return.

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(c) Michelle G, Northern Tamarisk, 2018

Equinox 2018 poem

Happy Equinox, everyone. May Winter’s pall make way for Spring’s more inviting shawl.

As it looked through the haze
The Sun saw it then;
The seed was a seed no more,
But with Spring’s eyes
It had shed its disguise
And was coming at last
Into bloom.
Out at last
From Winter’s gloom.

(c) Michelle Gilberthorpe, Northern Tamarisk, 2018

Shared: Tattooing in Ancient Nubia by Nile Scribes

This is an interesting read for anyone interested in Ancient Egyptian and Nubian history, as well as those interested in tattoos in general. The article is short but talks about different styles, symbolism, tools and pigments used.

Egyptologists previously believed that tattoos carried a fertility or erotic significance and applied only to women in ancient Egypt — a belief that is now challenged by these new findings. Friedman points out that the wild bull was a symbol of male potency in ancient Egypt… They suggest that ‘Gebelein Woman’s’ tattoos, on the other hand, may indicate “ceremonial or ritual” involvement based on their similarities to motifs on Predynastic ceramics, figurines, and a tattoo from the late New Kingdom (1,539-1,077 BC).

You can read the full article here:
http://nilescribes.org/2018/03/10/scribal-spotlight-tattooing-in-ancient-nubia/

Shrine for a beloved pet

My beloved Orlando passed away five years ago and there’s not a day that goes by that I don’t think of him. He was a beautiful soul, full of character, and when I became ill at 17 he became my rock. We became so much closer after that, and he pretty much devoted himself to my care. Whenever he was in the house he would come to spend time with me, whether in my room or on my bed. We had a special bond that I will never forget and I like to honour that.

Although he appears in my Ancestor shrine I wanted to create something a little more personal. Where we are currently has wide windowsills, and since Orlando used to love gazing out of my bedroom window at the world below I thought it a fitting place for a shrine for him. I bought the ornament a long time ago because it looked like him, and so I decided to get it out again (it had been packed away) and place it with two of my photos. In January mum let me become custodian of Orlando’s ashes, so I placed them with the photos and ornament and now the shrine feels more complete. I am also thinking of making some memorial prayer beads, with a bead for each year of his life.

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Creating a shrine for beloved pets is a really lovely way to honour them and their place in your life. I thoroughly recommend it.

 

(c) Michelle Gilberthorpe, Northern Tamarisk, 2018

Deck Review: The Ancient Egyptian Tarot by Clive Barrett

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I wanted to do something a bit different, so I’ve decided to write my very first deck review. Clive Barrett’s Ancient Egyptian Tarot was the first ever set of divination cards I bought, way back in 2005/2006. I have a couple of other tarot decks but these are the ones I connect to the most.

The Ancient Egyptian Tarot is illustrated by artist Clive Barrett, and the artwork is beautifully detailed. Each card is filled with Egyptian symbolism and numerous elements and ‘extras’ that really help to add depth to a reading. The suits are Wands, Swords, Cups and Disks. The court cards are King, Queen, Prince and Princess.

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