When the masks fall we meet Them as we Are

I have often enjoyed reading the works of mystics and contemplatives from different traditions. Those two words call to me again now. I have remarked to others several times before that I seemed to have been cast in a role akin to a pagan nun, not necessarily by choice, more through circumstance and beliefs.

I re-read Upon the Mountain: Prayer in the Carmelite Tradition by Sister Mary McCormack of the Carmelites last night and was reminded so much of the all-pervasive love I held for my Beloveds before the loss and upheaval of the last 6-7 weeks, the last month in particular. Sister Mary’s words reminded me of how my whole world seemed coloured by contemplation of Them, particularly Loki and Sigyn.

I wept as I read, because not only did her words remind me of what I have (for now, at least) lost, but because she speaks of the “dark night of the soul” where we face our own shadows, where all we hold dear falls away and leaves us grasping in the dark, often affecting our connection with the Divine. Yet Sister Mary, through her own words, those of St Therese of Avila and St John of the Cross, gives hope.
Only when we are broken down, only when we face those harsh truths about ourselves can we stand before the Divine, no longer encumbered by masks. Only then can we enter into a truer relationship with the Divine; one that transcends anything that may have come before. When we stand as we Are we greet our God(s) with our true face, our true Self, and any preconceptions of how we relate to Them can fall away, allowing our God(s) to in turn reveal more of Their true Selves to us.

So I have hope again. I am remembering once more that all roads lead back to Them, no matter the detours.
I am also determined in these things: never again will I allow the words and misconceptions of another to poison my link with the Gods. Never again will I forget that though I may go through trials They are always there. My heart is Theirs, my love is Theirs, my devotion is Theirs. All I go through breaks down barriers and leaves me a better person, and a more open heart to receive Their loving guidance.

With love and a sapling heart I reach once more for Them.

My deepest thanks go to J, who lent me the book that has provided such solace for my heart, and returned my determination to keep reaching for Them. Little did we know how important this tiny book would become only a matter of weeks later. May your Beloveds hold you deep within Their hearts.

Upon the Mountain: Prayer in the Carmelite Tradition can be bought from the Notting Hill Carmelites –http://carmelitesnottinghill.org.uk/product/upon-this-mountain-2/

Shared: Hathor Devotional callout

Hathor Devotional Call Out! – see the full details here: http://wp.me/p3de5o-Is

Bibliotheca Alexandrina is seeking submissions for Lady of the Sycamore: A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Hathor. This anthology opens for submissions on 1st November 2016 and closes on 1st May 2017, with a projected release date of August 2017.

 Suggestions for possible contributions include, but are not limited to: prayers, heka, poetry, hymns, rituals, essays, short fiction, recipes, music, and artwork.

 

Link: Temple Ritual at Abydos by Rosalie David

From the Egypt Exploration Society ‘s Twitter feed:

New volume now available! Rosalie David’s ‘Temple Ritual at Abydos’, packed full of archive photos and watercolours: https://t.co/Ae2bQ8zK6U https://t.co/YjPsy91fiP

From the website:

…Prof David added the complete translations and transliterations to the ritual inscriptions and revised the text; we selected images from the EES archives and especially from the 1930-50s Calverley & Broome folios with their magnificent watercolours…

The result is one the most ambitious volumes the EES has realised in some time and one of the most visually appealing too. On 392 pages you’ll find numerous line drawings, many full-colour reproductions of the scenes of ritual and sacrifice from the temple walls, and photographs from our archives.

Link: Egyptian Religious Calendar for 2017 now available

Amentet Neferet have released a 2017 edition of their wonderful Egyptian Religious Calendar. The book uses the same astronomical events the Ancient Egyptians would have used to calculate when their new year and seasons would begin, making it different from books that fit it in with our modern calendar. It details which Deity the day is sacred to and also the festivals the Egyptians would have celebrated. Sayings about appropriate behaviour and warnings from various Ancient Egyptian sources are also included in the daily digest.

I really love it, and am considering buying the digital version this year so I can upload it to my phone and kindle and take it with me wherever I want. Plus I have a habit of forgetting to check the paper edition I currently have as I like to keep my books tidied away. The only way I can think of improving the book is to have a spiral bound edition so you can leave it open on the relevant day’s page(s). That would have been a big help to me with the 2016 paperback I have now.

Here is the link to Amentet Neferet’s post: http://wp.me/p2DhMC-La

We are very glad to announce that our book “EGYPTIAN RELIGIOUS CALENDAR – Great Year of Ra CDXVII-CDXVIII (2017 CE)”the Complete Egyptian Religious Calendar with all the religious prescriptions and the sacred festivities for the year 2017, is now available on amazon.com both in paperback format and as a digital ebook…

Note: I have not received any incentive to promote this book. I am doing so because it has helped me in my own devotional practice.