Channeling Isis – when Set arrives legless

One of my more recent tasks has been to reconnect with the Egyptian God Set. This Deity has fascinated me for years. With the breaking down of my old self I realise that my focus needs to be more balanced. Although Loki and Family are still truly Beloved to me, I have neglected ties with many of my Beloved Egyptian Deities.

As recompense I said prayers to Set, asking Him if He still wished to work with me, and if He would grant me His protection. I said I would like to buy a bigger statue for Him, as the current one was only around 2 inches high – the smallest on the altar. A good Set statue is hard to find in the UK, and I looked online but couldn’t find one.

Two days later I was sat in front of my altar and my attention was drawn to a book on my right. It was an Ancient Egyptian Herbal by Lise Manniche. I had done bits of bibliomancy before, so took the hint and turned to a random page. The entry was for Watermelon. According to the book Watermelon was created when Set spilled his seed chasing Isis in the form of a bull. It was used in a wine for protection against evil ‘demons’. Since I’d asked for Set’s protection during a very difficult and vulnerable time I took it as a sign. I looked online for Watermelon wine but to no avail. I did, however, come across some Watermelon liqueur. Asking Set through my pendulum whether he would like the liqueur for offerings I got a resounding “Yes” and ordered it.

Later that afternoon I got an ebay alert saying a Set statue had been listed! Now, you could look at this as three completely unconnected, random events, but I choose not to. To me this is cause and effect: you pray and make reparations, you ask for help, and express a wish to more openly honour Them, and They respond.

One week later Set’s statue arrived… His legs had been broken off in transit. I wondered if it was just bad luck, but when I sat and asked for guidance I received a surprising answer: for Set to help me stand strong on my own two feet I needed to involve myself in a bit of like-for-like ‘magic’. I have repaired and renewed Deity statues before, and in doing so with Set’s statue I would be channeling my inner Isis; my inner healer and magic worker. Isis pieced her husband Osiris back together, so taking on Her mantle and fixing Set was setting Him back on His own two feet, helping His statue stand strong. In turn He could do the same for me.

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Does that look like a happy face to you?

The Egyptians believed that statues actually become receptacles for the Deities, and so any statue could provide a ‘home’ or respite for the Deity. Even in His broken state Set’s statue exuded power. I couldn’t help but look at it. It’s a feeling I have very strongly with my beautiful statue of Bast, and to a lesser extent with my other Deity statues.

A few days ago I was well enough to piece Set back together again, and restore His dignity as well as His stride. I got a really strong feeling of approval when I was finally able to place Him on the altar, resplendent and standing tall. I made an offering of the Watermelon liqueur, and anointed Him with Lotus oil along with my other Beloveds. Since then I have made some steps forward – baby steps, but progress all the same. As an apology for Set arriving damaged the seller is also sending me a statue of Thoth/ Djehuty, so that’s a nice surprise – I’ve been reconnecting with Him too.

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Set standing resplendent with His mini-me, beside Maahes and Sekhmet

I am grateful to Set for coming back into my life, offering His protection and guidance, and showing me that They are truly forgiving. It also shows me that if we have the genuine desire to reconnect it can happen.

Selket to greet travellers to Cairo + a prayer to the Goddess

News & picture source: @Pastpreservers on Twitter  https://twitter.com/Pastpreservers/status/816279536140685314?s=09

 What better way to be greeted on arrival in Cairo than by a Goddess? I love Selket (also known as Serqet), I have a much smaller version of this rendering of her on my own altar. It’s lovely to see modern Egypt embracing its past in such a blatantly obvious way. Yes, it’s probably to attract more tourists but with all the threats against so many religious beliefs right now it’s heartening to see one of the Old Ones making such a bold appearance.

Lady of the Desert
Let us wander freely among your sands,
Let us honour your name with each safe step
And each safe passage.
We beseech you, Lady of Scorpions,
To hold your sting
For those who would do harm.
Let us walk under your protective gaze
And ever be in your favour.

(© Michelle Gilberthorpe, Northern Tamarisk, 2017)

Shared: Hathor Devotional callout

Hathor Devotional Call Out! – see the full details here: http://wp.me/p3de5o-Is

Bibliotheca Alexandrina is seeking submissions for Lady of the Sycamore: A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Hathor. This anthology opens for submissions on 1st November 2016 and closes on 1st May 2017, with a projected release date of August 2017.

 Suggestions for possible contributions include, but are not limited to: prayers, heka, poetry, hymns, rituals, essays, short fiction, recipes, music, and artwork.

 

Set-beast investigation #1: Saiga Antelope

There are many theories about whether the Set-beast is based on a real animal, whether it is a compilation of creatures (like Ammit), or a completely mythological being.
While watching the ‘Grasslands’ episode of Sir David Attenborough’s ‘Planet Earth II’ I came face to face with an Ice Age relic: the Saiga Antelope. Just look at that nose! How can you not see a resemblance to the Egyptian God Set when you look at it?

By Vladimir Yu. Arkhipov, Arkhivov – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8955913

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Link: Temple Ritual at Abydos by Rosalie David

From the Egypt Exploration Society ‘s Twitter feed:

New volume now available! Rosalie David’s ‘Temple Ritual at Abydos’, packed full of archive photos and watercolours: https://t.co/Ae2bQ8zK6U https://t.co/YjPsy91fiP

From the website:

…Prof David added the complete translations and transliterations to the ritual inscriptions and revised the text; we selected images from the EES archives and especially from the 1930-50s Calverley & Broome folios with their magnificent watercolours…

The result is one the most ambitious volumes the EES has realised in some time and one of the most visually appealing too. On 392 pages you’ll find numerous line drawings, many full-colour reproductions of the scenes of ritual and sacrifice from the temple walls, and photographs from our archives.

Link: Egyptian Religious Calendar for 2017 now available

Amentet Neferet have released a 2017 edition of their wonderful Egyptian Religious Calendar. The book uses the same astronomical events the Ancient Egyptians would have used to calculate when their new year and seasons would begin, making it different from books that fit it in with our modern calendar. It details which Deity the day is sacred to and also the festivals the Egyptians would have celebrated. Sayings about appropriate behaviour and warnings from various Ancient Egyptian sources are also included in the daily digest.

I really love it, and am considering buying the digital version this year so I can upload it to my phone and kindle and take it with me wherever I want. Plus I have a habit of forgetting to check the paper edition I currently have as I like to keep my books tidied away. The only way I can think of improving the book is to have a spiral bound edition so you can leave it open on the relevant day’s page(s). That would have been a big help to me with the 2016 paperback I have now.

Here is the link to Amentet Neferet’s post: http://wp.me/p2DhMC-La

We are very glad to announce that our book “EGYPTIAN RELIGIOUS CALENDAR – Great Year of Ra CDXVII-CDXVIII (2017 CE)”the Complete Egyptian Religious Calendar with all the religious prescriptions and the sacred festivities for the year 2017, is now available on amazon.com both in paperback format and as a digital ebook…

Note: I have not received any incentive to promote this book. I am doing so because it has helped me in my own devotional practice.

Link: The Egyptian Bead Project

Finally a project that combines two of my loves: Egypt and beading.

the Egyptian Bead Project is a collaborative and multidisciplinary research program for all scholars interested in beads and beadwork. It aims to use archaeological artifact studies to increase our understanding of the role of beads and beadwork, and also trade and technologies related to beads in ancient Egypt.

You can read more on the website:
http://www.egyptianbeadproject.com