For Sigyn

Sigyn is the Pole Star –
Shining light;
Axis mundi.

Lady of mercy,
Well of compassion,
Beloved Heart.

She is the hand
That holds ours
In times of sorrow,

The hand that
Leads in the dark
And gloom.

She is the Keeper
Of all we hold dear.
She keeps it safe

For us
When we cannot
Hold it for ourselves.

She is the rose
That blooms
With heavenly scent,

Lifting both
Heart and mind,
Tending the soul,

Covering it
In Her gentle
Velvet-soft embrace.

She is the light
In the dark,
The guide, the spark

Of Divine
That guides us home
To our Self.

She loves us,
Foibles, mistakes and all.
She always leads us home.

———
(c) Michelle Gilberthorpe, Northern Tamarisk, 2017

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Ixchel, the Mesoamerican influence, South American Shamanism and Palo Santo 

I first learned about the Mesoamerican culture in my teens in history classes, when we were studying the Spanish armada and the Conquistadors. I also saw a program on the Discovery Channel and was hooked. I watched as many programs as I could, later turning to books – cenotes in particular fascinate me. I based a GCSE drama assignment on the Aztecs – something about an argument between the Sun God Huitzilopotchtli and the Moon Goddess Mitztli – I got to play Mitztli, complete with a big silver crescent moon tied to my head. I even went to an exhibition on the Aztecs in London and based an A-level art project on the statues I saw there. Quetzalcoatl, Xipe Totec and Coatlicue were particularly memorable. When I started exploring spirituality and opening up to Spirit I dreamed of two temples, and after trawling the internet I found out they were the Mayan temples of Tikal and Palenque. A few years ago the Mayan Goddess Ixchel seemed to come in a lot; never saying anything, but coming in during certain times of pain and making it known She was there. She is said to have founded Palenque.

When Loki came into my life three years were devoted pretty much solely to Him, Sigyn and Their family. While I wouldn’t take back those amazing years for anything it meant that I often didn’t give much attention to my other Beloveds. Since the upheavals that started in late February my attentions have gotten more diverse, and I’m engaging with more of my Beloveds. I’m also getting more coming back into my life.

Last month I had three instances in a week where Ixchel came up. I took the hint and reminded myself a little about her, and among other things She is a Goddess of childbirth (so connected with gestation and birthing in all senses), weaving, water and also of healing. I believe She is coming in to help me with my own rebirth, helping me with the deeper levels of healing and reintegration.

Here is a photo of my lovely Ixchel statue. She was created by Studio Lindy on Etsy. Ixchel came all the way from Australia, so She’s had a long journey to get to me. She even took a detour back to Lindy because Royal Mail decided they had a problem with the address, but she finally made it to me. She looks rather at home on my window sill.

I’m also being called back to my interest in Mesoamerican culture, and of South American Shamanism. I’m not going to start calling myself a Shaman, but the spirit of those practices calls to something deep within me, and has done for around 10 years. It’s something I learned a lot from before, and feel I can learn a lot from it again now.
This comes combined with a dream I had in May where I was buying a bottle of Palo Santo water. I had heard of the wood but hadn’t felt drawn to it before. Along with Ixchel and the Mesoamerican influence coming back in I took it as a sign that Palo Santo is something I need to work with. I remembered clearly the company’s logo I saw on the bottle in the dream, so I looked them up and lo and behold they sell Palo Santo water – I hadn’t looked at their website before, I’d only seen them advertised in a magazine I used to buy. They also had the essential oil (ethically sourced and harvested) so I treated myself to some, along with a sample piece of the wood for smudging. While browsing I came across a wooden egg-shaped rattle, and when I tried to click on the ‘more information’ link the page jumped (the signal on my phone is dodgy so pages don’t always load properly) and the egg rattle was added to my basket! I checked with Them through my pendulum whether this was just coincidence but no, I was supposed to have it. When I finally got the information loaded it said the rattle could be used for rebirth ceremonies – message received.

So here are my Palo Santo goodies:

The essential oil smells a little like Frankincense (Boswellia carterii) with a hint of pine and something more earthy. It’s really good for cleansing the aura of any negativity, attachments and untoward spirit influence. I’ve also found using a drop in each palm and then inhaling the scent to be very grounding.
I haven’t tried burning the wood yet but it has a lovely smell to it; woody, earthy and slightly sweet. It’s often used in cleansing rituals.
Unfortunately I cannot recommend this particular brand of Palo Santo water. It has additives in it and a fragrance that smells like aftershave. It is, however, still very effective in a cleansing bath.
I am looking up other options for Palo Santo water, but there aren’t many suppliers in the UK, and it is quite pricy. I may experiment with Palo Santo wood in vodka as a kind of tincture and water it down. I’ll keep you updated.

International Vulture Awareness Day 2017 – Focus on Nekhbet & Mut

IVAD logo 2014

Did you know that today is International Vulture Awareness Day? Many of these beautiful birds are now threatened or facing extinction, and population numbers are declining the world over. The Egyptian Vulture, which was known in Ancient Egypt, is on the endangered list. The Griffon Vulture, also known in Ancient Egypt, is the only one on the list that is of ‘least concern’.

The first Saturday of September every year is International Vulture Awareness Day (IVAD). Started in 2006 by the Endangered Wildlife Trust’s Birds of Prey Programme and the Hawk Conservancy Trust, plus a range of partners and associates, IVAD has become a global event supported by the IUCN SSC Vulture Specialist Group; in 2016, 164 organisations from 47 countries participated. IVAD aims to create awareness about vultures as a whole, garner support among the public about the plight of vultures globally and highlight the work done by conservationists to protect these birds and their habitats.

Vultures are a characteristic, distinctive and spectacular component of the biodiversity of the environments they inhabit. They also provide critically important ecosystem services by cleaning up carcasses and other organic waste in the environment; they are nature’s garbage collectors and this translates into significant economic benefits. Studies have shown that in areas where there are no vultures, carcasses take up to three or four times longer to decompose. This has huge implications for the spread of diseases in both wild and domestic animals, as well as elevating pathogenic risks to humans.

http://www.vultureday.org/action/

You can find more information on the International Vulture Awareness Day website
They have kids activities and also colouring pages of different vultures on their downloads page, and you can also download this cute ‘Vultures of the World’ PDF

vulture of the world

Two species of vulture were known in Ancient Egypt – the Griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) and the Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus). The Griffon vulture is the one most commonly depicted. On its own it represents the phonetic value of A, and was used to write the word mut, meaning ‘mother’. With the largest wingspan of any bird in Ancient Egypt the outspread wings of the vulture were seen as offering protection¹, and became a popular motif in Egytian art and jewellery. As vulture Goddesses Nekhbet and Mut became symbols of maternal love and protection. In the Late Period the vulture was: ‘…a symbol of the female principle and stood in juxtaposition to the beetle as the embodiment of the male principle.’²
The vulture headdress was seen as a ‘symbol and ideogram of motherhood’³ and also associated any Queen who wore it with Mut as consort of the state God, Amun, and also with Nekhbet as protectress of Upper Egypt¹.

In Religion of Ancient Egypt Byron E. Schafer tells of two myths where bird imagery was used to relate to the sky, one of them the vulture. He suggests that they were a remnant from before the more unified mythological system of later times – ‘The other mythological description represents the sky as a vulture. Perhaps this image goes back to the iconography of Nekhbet, the Predynastic goddess of Upper Egypt… or perhaps it is linked with the Theban Mut (written with the vulture hieroglyph) “the Mother”, consort of Amun-Re…4

Nekhbet is the patron Deity of Upper Egypt, her centre of worship being Nekheb/ Nekhen (modern El Kab), the capital of the 3rd nome (state). She is known as She of Nekheb, and The White One of Nekhen. Nekhbet is associated with the white crown of Upper Egypt, and alongside her Lower Egypt counterpart, Wadjet, is part of the Two Ladies, who represent the unification of the Two Lands of Egypt. She is usually depicted as a vulture but can also appear as a cobra, like Wadjet. Occasionally Nekhbet was shown as a woman wearing a vulture cap, or sometimes the white crown of Upper Egypt.
She is often shown carrying a shen hieroglyph – ‘Whenever Nekhbet… held in her claws the hieroglyphic sign… which reads shen, ‘to encircle’, [it] denotes that Nekhbet offers a king sovereignty over all that the sun encircles.’¹ She is believed to have a role in nursing the king, and is seen as a mythological mother of the ruler. In the New Kingdom and the Late Period Nekhbet was known as a protector and Goddess of childbirth. The Greeks associated her with their own Goddess of childbirth, Eileithya.5 In her role as protectress Nekhbet as a vulture is often shown on Egyptian jewellery, usually on pectorals and broad collars. A famous example comes from the tomb of Tutankhamun.
As the Two Ladies Nekhbet and Wadjet were called nebty – ‘The ‘nebti’ hieroglyph was the sign for the vulture goddess Nekhbet of Upper Egypt… and the cobra goddess Wadjet of Lower Egypt… It became a standard element of a pharaoh’s name from dynasty 12, although it was used as early as dynasty 1.’6 The nebty amulet itself afforded the highest protection to its wearer.7

Mut replaced Aumnet as consort of Amun, and became the mother of Khonsu. She is often depicted as a woman with the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt resting atop a vulture headdress – the only Goddess to be shown with this specific combination. The double crown ties in with the link to kingship, as the unification of the Two Lands of Egypt, and a representation of nebti, the Two Ladies. The vulture is said to be her sacred animal, but there is some debate about whether Mut was originally represented as a vulture. Richard H. Wilkinson does not believe this to be the case. In reference to the use of the Griffon vulture, used in the hieroglyphic depiction of her name, as being evidence for an earlier vulture form he says: ‘this is doubtful and the word mut and the vulture used to write it means ‘mother’ and this deity was regarded both generally as a mother goddess and as the mother of the king in particular.5 Herman te Velde also agrees, stating: ‘…she was not a vulture goddess like Nekhbet, as is often suggested in older literature’³. Barbara Watterson, however, disagrees: ‘…she was probably worshipped in predynastic times in the form of a griffin vulture (Gyps fulvus). The word mut, which is written using the hieroglyph depicting this vulture, is thought to have been old Egyptian for ‘vulture’, but was replaced in the Egyptian language of later times by another, neret, also meaning vulture. Thus the hieroglyph of the griffin vulture was reserved for writing the name of the goddess Mut.’¹
Mut is very much a Mother Goddess, and is even depicted in amuletic form like Isis, suckling a child at her breast. It is thought the child could be Khonsu, but could also represent the King, as Mut takes on a protective, and also nurturing role, as the King’s Divine Mother.
She is closely linked with Sekhmet, and even has a leonine form herself. As such she is also an Eye of Ra, adding to her protective elements. She is also linked with Bast, and had a joint form as Mut-Bastet. She does not appear much in funerary texts, but does appear in the Book of the Dead in Chapter 164 ‘as a composite deity with outstretched wings, an erect phallus and three heads – those of a vulture, lion and human.’5
Spell 164 follows on from spell 163, which was used ‘for preventing a man’s corpse from putrefying in the realm of the dead in order to rescue him from the eater of souls who imprisons in the Netherworld and to prevent accusations of his crimes upon earth being imputed to him… to allow him to come and go as he wants and to do everything which is in his heart without being restrained.’9

SPELL 164: ‘To be said over (a figure of) Mut having three heads: one being the head of Pakhet wearing plumes, a second being a human head wearing the Double Crown, the third being the head of a vulture wearing double plumes. She also has a phallus, wings and the claws of a lion. Drawn in dried myrrh with fresh incense, repeated in ink upon a red bandage. A dwarf stands before her, another behind her, each facing her and wearing plumes. Each has a raised arm and two heads, one is the head of a falcon, the other a human head.

‘Wrap the breast therewith: he shall be a god among gods in the realm of the dead. He shall not be repulsed forever. His flesh and bones shall be sound like one who does not die. He shall drink water from the river; land shall be given to him in the Field of Rushes; a star of the sky shall be given to him. He shall be preserved from the serpent, the hot-tempered one who is in the Netherworld. His soul shall not be imprisoned. The djeriu-bird shall rescue him from the one at his side and no maggot shall eat him.9

On the aegis collar Mut sometimes appears beside a select few other Goddesses: ‘All the goddesses… represented on the counterpoise had connections of fertility but in addition were powerful deities who could afford protection. Moreover, the position of the counterpoise between the shoulder blades meant that it could guard this most vulnerable area.’ 7
She was worshipped by both men and women, having both priests and priestesses. The most important of her priestesses were called God’s Wives of Amun, and were regarded as Mut’s earthly incarnation.8 Mut is said to be: ‘the female compassion man meets in his mother, sister, daughter and – to a certain extent – in his wife…’ ³
One of Mut’s epithets is The Great One, Mistress of Isheru.

Bibliography – those quoted from:
¹ Gods of Ancient Egypt – Barbara Watterson, pages 148-9 (Mut), and page 132 (Nekhbet).
² An Illustrated Dictionary of the Gods and Symbols of Ancient Egypt – Manfred Lurker, page 127
³ The Oxford Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology, entry for Mut written by Herman te Velde.
4 Religion in Ancient Egypt – Byron E. Schafer, page 121.
5 The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt – Richard H. Wilkinson, pages 153 & 155.
6 The Little Book of Egyptian Hieroglyphs – Lesley and Roy Adkins , page 96
7 Amulets of Ancient Egypt – Carol Andrews, pages 42 & 76.
8 Dictionary of Ancient Egypt – Toby Wilkinson, entries for Mut, Nekhbet and Vulture.
9 The Egyptian Book of the Dead – R. O. Faulkner , pages 159-60

Shared: Sobek Devotional looking for submissions

A while ago I was gifted a deck of Hachette Egyptian tarot-type cards by a man whose witchy shop I used to visit. Unfortunately the shop had to close down, but I remember that little place of magic and mystery fondly. Anyway, back to the cards: I haven’t used them in a long time, and last night I felt drawn to use them again. The card that came up was Sobek. I wondered why the Great Crocodile had paid me a visit, and then I remembered that there is a Sobek devotional looking for submissions. So I have taken Sobek’s hint to share the link, and I will await to see if He inspires me to create an entry of my own.

We’re a month in and I’ve had some submissions so far, but I would love to have more. If anyone’s thinking of submitting something, please send it in! This devotional can’t happen without your submissions, so please get in touch. sobekdevotionalATgmail.com

via PSA: Send me things for the Sobek Devotional! — Per Sebek

Changes and update – I am a Polytheist, first and foremost

I am a Spiritual Nomad.
There is no tradition where I hang my hat.
I answer the call of the Deities,
Following the path They direct me on,
Working with Whoever decides
To make Themselves known to me.
For however long or short
A time that may be.

I am a Polytheist, first and foremost. While I adore my Deities, I have come to feel constricted by indentifying myself so strongly with the Northern Tradition. The truth is that the Gods and Goddesses, the Spirits of the land, and the land itself are my belief system. I feel constrained by the structure of a path where I’m told the way I relate to my Deities is ‘wrong’ somehow. I feel like a butterfly pinned down while still alive, unable to spread my wings and fly into my own flow.

So while I respect those in the Northern Tradition for choosing one path, I realise now that it is not mine. Loki, Sigyn, Hella, Jormungand and Family remain my Beloveds, and They will continue to be much-loved and honoured by me. But the Tradition itself is not for me. I will continue to find pleasure and meaning in reading the Eddas, and pondering my Norse Beloveds, and I will continue to research Norse culture as I please. But the main words I am reclaiming for this are freedom and enjoyment.

I love my Gods, and I love them in ways that go beyond words. That also goes beyond the ‘guidelines’ of any one tradition. I feel trying to adhere to these ‘guidelines’ limits how I interact and work with my Deities… all for the sake of being seen to do it ‘properly’. If you read Love Your Gods Your Way you will see that I have been struggling with this issue of being seen to do things ‘the right way’ for a while.

I have have many Beloveds in the Egyptian pantheon too, but recently I have started to have a number of Deities coming in Who also wish to be honoured, from a number of different cultures. Some simply wish for me to honour Them, Others wish to help instruct me through phases of development, and still Others are coming in to work more deeply. And I wish to honour and work with Them. And I cannot fully do that while I still cling to labels and practices that are not suitable for who I am now, and for where I’m heading.

I am a devotional Polytheist, first and foremost. And while I will be writing about my Norse Beloveds I am moving beyond the label of ‘Northern Tradition’ so I can better honour my many Beloveds in a way that allows me to grow not only in myself, but in my relationships with Them. Because Their opinions are what matters the most to me. As long as They are happy with my individual and unique practice that is all that truly matters.

 

Divine signs – moving and renewal

How is this for a sign that things are both ‘on the move’ and renewing? The council has decided (after umpteen years of it being overdue) to choose today to start resurfacing the road through our tiny village. Today also happens to be phase one of us moving house. Tomorrow we complete it and move into our rental property.

Roads are about exploring new avenues, and moving on to better things. In being resurfaced they can also represent smoothing over the ‘scars’ and hurts of the past, all the bumpy patches, and bringing about healing.

So is the road work starting on the same day we start moving out sod’s law, or a divine sign? I prefer to choose the latter explanation.

Poem for Loki

Sharing the end of a poem I wrote early this morning, dedicated to Himself. In some ways Loki reminds me of elements of Shiva, with His divine dance of destruction that leads to renewal, the fire that burns away and leads to new, stronger growth.

Sometimes all
Must fall apart
To reach the truest
Depth of heart,

And there He’ll stand,
Dancer, Singer,
Trickster, Sage,
Loki: Light Bringer.