Traditional Crafts at Local Village Fair

Last Summer my parents and I visited a neighbouring village for their annual village fair. It’s been going for hundreds of years, and there are no signs of it stopping any time soon. What was lovely to see, amongst the craft stalls, were two areas showcasing traditional crafts.

Rob lives in our village and makes traditional wooden frame buildings. He also does thatched roofs. He had a display of some of the techniques used, and was even giving a demonstration of how he cuts beams into shape by hand.

The tent of a local community historical society was particularly fascinating. They displayed some of the finds from an archaeological dig at their church.

The members of the society themselves also got to try their hand at crafts relevant to the period their church and the finds were from. These included kiln building, making clay bowls, stone carving, flint knapping, and even corn dollies.

There were also live demonstrations of rag rug making, wool spinning and calligraphy work.

Outside the tent a man was weaving a fence panel from willow.

The hour or so we were there made for a very pleasant diversion, and also surprised us with the cultural elements.
On a side note, I bought a partner for my felt partridge. One of my friends is a multi-talented florist who makes lots of crafty delights. So Penny is now joined by Patricia, and I hope to continue to add more to their little family.

Has a shrine dedicated to Olaf Haraldsson been discovered in Trondheim?

Researchers from the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage believe they have unearthed the stone foundations of a wooden church where the body of King Olaf Haraldsson was taken in 1031 shortly after he was declared a saint.

For more information see this article: http://www.archaeology.org/news/5040-161123-norway-olaf-reburial

5,600-year-old religious centre discovered near Stonehenge

Another causewayed enclosure has been discovered near Stonehenge. It is located in Larkhill, Wiltshire, and is thought to date from around 3,650 BC.  Once again a new discovery is leading to a review of exactly how the sacred landscape around the site was used.

Their precise original function remains a mystery, but the scant available evidence suggests that they were used for a mixture of ceremonial, religious, political and mortuary roles.

You can read the full article on the Independent’s website:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/stonehenge-prehistoric-religious-ceremonial-centre-discovered-archaeologists-a7425346.html

Skeleton found in well confirms Viking Saga – The Archaeology News Network

Excavations of a well in Trondheim, Norway, have revealed the skeleton of a man. Archaeologists say this may be evidence that the saga of King Sverre is actually based on historical events.

https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/skeleton-found-in-well-confirms-viking.html?m=1#Hxe5PSI1srWWOwLv.97

Visit Philae Temple from home!

If you cannot go to Egypt to see the wonders of Philae Temple despair not. Many of us can’t travel as much as we’d like, whether the reason is illness, time, money or safety concerns, so imagine my delight when I found out about this project. Describing Egypt is a modern take on the old Description de l’Egypte, capturing the splendor of Ancient Egypt’s monuments in 360°. As well as Philae the group have also captured the tombs of Rammesses VI, Sennedjem, the mastaba of Ptah-Hotep and Akhet-Hotep, and the mastaba of Ty.

Capture_Philae

Beautiful Photos From Barcelona Egyptian Exhibition

These are a very small selection of photos from the album by Merya on Flickr. They are from the ‘Animals and Pharaohs’ exhibition that was at the Caixa Forum in Barcelona, Spain until January this year. If you love Egypt, in particular the animals associated with various Deities, then you should take a look.