Shared article: Statues of ancient Egyptian lioness deity Sekhmet uncovered in Luxor

Shared from Ahram Online. Article written by  Nevine El-Aref , Sunday 3 Dec 2017

A collection of 27 fragmented statues of the lioness goddess Sekhmet has been uncovered during excavation work at the King Amenhotep III funerary temple at the Kom El-Hettan area on Luxor’s west bank.

Mostafa Waziri, secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, said the black-granite statues have a maximum height of about two metres. Some statues depict Sekhmet sitting on a throne, holding the symbol of life in her left hand, while others show her standing and holding a papyrus sceptre before her chest. The head of Sekhmet is crowned with a sun-disk, while a uraeus adorns her forehead.

The mission began excavation work in 1998, and about 287 statues of Sekhmet have been unearthed since then.

You can read the full article here: http://english.ahram.org.eg/News/282656.aspx

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Traditional Crafts at Local Village Fair

Last Summer my parents and I visited a neighbouring village for their annual village fair. It’s been going for hundreds of years, and there are no signs of it stopping any time soon. What was lovely to see, amongst the craft stalls, were two areas showcasing traditional crafts.

Rob lives in our village and makes traditional wooden frame buildings. He also does thatched roofs. He had a display of some of the techniques used, and was even giving a demonstration of how he cuts beams into shape by hand.


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5,600-year-old religious centre discovered near Stonehenge

Another causewayed enclosure has been discovered near Stonehenge. It is located in Larkhill, Wiltshire, and is thought to date from around 3,650 BC.  Once again a new discovery is leading to a review of exactly how the sacred landscape around the site was used.

Their precise original function remains a mystery, but the scant available evidence suggests that they were used for a mixture of ceremonial, religious, political and mortuary roles.

You can read the full article on the Independent’s website:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/stonehenge-prehistoric-religious-ceremonial-centre-discovered-archaeologists-a7425346.html

Visit Philae Temple from home!

If you cannot go to Egypt to see the wonders of Philae Temple despair not. Many of us can’t travel as much as we’d like, whether the reason is illness, time, money or safety concerns, so imagine my delight when I found out about this project. Describing Egypt is a modern take on the old Description de l’Egypte, capturing the splendor of Ancient Egypt’s monuments in 360°. As well as Philae the group have also captured the tombs of Rammesses VI, Sennedjem, the mastaba of Ptah-Hotep and Akhet-Hotep, and the mastaba of Ty.

Capture_Philae