Project: protective herbal pouches

I’ve been thinking of doing something like this for a while. I love experimenting with herbs, oils, salts, waters and crystals. I’ve been working on different cleansing bath variations for a couple of months now and I have a couple of favourites. While they help I also wanted something I could keep in place as protective charms.

I have my own dried Hawthorn and Sloe berries from our garden, and mum had some Hawthorn tea bags she didn’t want, so I rummaged through my herbal chest to see what felt right. With a bit of guidance from Loki I now have four little protective pouches. It feels great to be engaging with my Witchy side again after she’s been mostly dormant for the last few years.

It’s important to concentrate on and set the intention while you create the pouches. The ingredients I used were:

  • Hawthorn tea bags (leaves & flowers)
  • Hawthorn berries (dried)
  • Sloe berries (dried)
  • Elder berries (dried)
  • Rose petals (dried)
  • White Sage leaves (dried)
  • Palo Santo essential oil

Anyway, here are some photos:

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Devotional tips for those with chronic illnesses and limited energy

For those of us with limited energy reserves or physical capabilities it can sometimes be difficult to do devotions. So I thought I’d share a few things that have helped in my own practice.

  • Have some sort of visible ritual calendar so you don’t forget important dates. If your calendar has large enough daily sections write the dates on in a different colour to normal entries. A wipe-board is also useful for this purpose, especially if you want to write notes of supplies or ideas for rituals and prayers. If you have to be in bed a lot have this where you can see it clearly.p1050753
  • Don’t be too hard on yourself if you can’t do the devotions! Just talk to Them, apologise for not being able to do the devotions, but tell Them that you still honour and love Them.
  • Say good morning and goodnight to Them. It’s a simple greeting but brings Them into your daily life even if you’re not able to do devotions.
  • Usually cleansing of some sort is appropriate when entering the sacred space of the shrine or devotional area. If you don’t have the energy to wash, or the focus to mentally cleanse, make up an aura spray for that purpose. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy; just water and some salt in a spray bottle is a good start. You can add more ingredients if you wish to. Use before devotions or when you want to talk to Them about anything specific or important.
  • If you can manage nothing else try to put a glass of water out for Them. It is a basic offering but shows you’re committed and making an effort.

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Five tips to help with research and note taking

These are some general tips that I have found useful when researching.

1) Buy or borrow the hardback versions of books where possible. Their spines are more forgiving, and are easier to leave open. This is especially useful for comparing texts and translations.

2) Use mini indexing sticky notes/ post-its to mark important passages in books. When you write up your notes you can then review whether you really need to write them down. I recommend reading the book all the way through first as sometimes you can come across a more useful passage later on.

3) With Kindle books take advantage of the highlighting system. You can take the notes from ‘My Clippings’ and create a new document, then review and edit as you see fit. Save the new document and print off.

4) If you have the book or article at home don’t tell yourself you have a set time in the day when you have to do your research unless you really have no other option. Using the index-sticky method I often find I can read through research material better at night. I then write up the notes in the daytime.

5) Use the library, especially for rare and more expensive books. Even if your local library service doesn’t have a copy of the book you’re looking for they can often borrow one from elsewhere. They may charge a small fee, but it’s well worth it and costs less than buying the books yourself. In some cases, unless you are part of a university or academic body, you cannot get hold of a book. In this instance the library inter-loan service is vital. It is thanks to this service I am currently reading ‘The Problem of Loki’ by Jan de Vries; there is no copy available to buy, at any price, and I am not part of a university or academic body.

I hope these tips provide some food for thought.